The Secret Garden: A Young Reader's Edition of the Classic Story

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ReadHowYouWant.com, Nov 1, 2006 - Juvenile Fiction - 400 pages
28 Reviews
This novel is about a secret garden which changes the life of three children forever. It is a moving, magical account of the mysteries of childhood, and how simple things in life can bring so much joy to people. Mary, Collin and Dickens revive a mysterious dead garden and in-return get a lot more than they bargained for.
  

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Review: The Secret Garden

User Review  - Martha - Goodreads

What a magical mystery tour this was! The Secret Garden, by Frances Hodgson Burnett, was recommended to me by a friend who knows my affinity toward beautiful landscape descriptions. What a field day I ... Read full review

Review: The Secret Garden

User Review  - Hana - Goodreads

It's here! My replacement copy of the 1949 Lippincott edition, illustrated by Nora Unwin just arrived. My childhood copy was lost in a flood. I've missed it like an old and very dear friend. http ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

CHAPTER I
1
CHAPTER II
10
CHAPTER III
23
CHAPTER IV
30
CHAPTER V
56
CHAPTER VI
66
CHAPTER VII
76
CHAPTER VIII
86
CHAPTER XV
198
CHAPTER XVI
216
CHAPTER XVII
228
CHAPTER XVIII
239
CHAPTER XIX
250
CHAPTER XX
267
CHAPTER XXI
280
CHAPTER XXII
296

CHAPTER IX
98
CHAPTER X
113
CHAPTER XI
131
CHAPTER XII
144
CHAPTER XIII
158
CHAPTER XIV
179
CHAPTER XXIII
305
CHAPTER XXIV
323
CHAPTER XXV
341
CHAPTER XXVI
352
CHAPTER XXVII
367
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Frances Hodgson Burnett wrote for children and adults, publishing both plays and novels. She was born in Manchester, England, on November 24, 1849. Her father, who owned a furniture store, died when she was only four years old. Her mother struggled to keep the family business running while trying to raise five children. Finally, because of the failing Manchester economy, the family sold the store and immigrated to the United States. In 1865 they settled just outside of Knoxville, Tennessee. Hoping to offset her family's continuing financial troubles, Burnett began to submit her stories to women's magazines. She was immediately successful. In the late 1860s her stories were published in nearly every popular American magazine. Burnett helped to support her family with income from the sale of her stories, even saving enough to finance a trip back to England, where she stayed for over a year. In 1879, Burnett published her first stories for children; two of her most popular are A Little Princess and The Secret Garden. In contrast to an extremely successful career, Burnett's personal life held many challenges. Her son Lionel was diagnosed with tuberculosis at age 15, from which he never recovered. His death inspired several stories about dead or dying children. Burnett lived her later years on Long Island, New York. She died in 1924.

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